Author: Jurgen Czechowsky

Well it’s that time of year when you see all those relatives that you haven’t seen since last year at this same time.  Why is that?  Hmmm, I’ll let you speculate on that.  Maybe for you it also brings a feeling of dread, especially when Aunt Sally never listens to you about your life threatening food allergy.  After all it’s just “in your head”! Why is it every time she sees you she tells you that you have crazy food preferences and it’s really just a bother to have to make something different for you?  Makes you feel kind of special, doesn’t it?

We can dislike what’s happening and wish for the past which we thought was secure and stable, but that reality is gone.  Many of us grew up with thinking there was such a thing as job security, life-time jobs, being financially secure and being able to retire at 65 or sooner (remember Freedom 55, well not so much).  We are in a world of globalization and whether we like it or not it’s here to stay.  Globalization has been around for a long time but has been accelerated due to ease of travel, new technologies, improved global communication, the internet, multi-national companies, trade agreements

  choices                                                                                                                                                                        Job loss, what do those words conjure up for you?  Anger, relief, anxiety, uncertainty, grief, devastated, worthless, I am sure I could go on but you get the picture.  Job loss is one of those stressors that impact us, our families, our relationships and our finances.  Our world, as we knew it, has now been drastically altered and for most of us that is unnerving. The world is changing, globalization is a reality, manual manufacturing jobs are decreasing, and technology is increasing and ever changing us and our world.  We can dislike what’s happening and wish for the past which we thought was secure and stable, but that reality is gone. 

Perhaps your marriage is going pretty well. Things are fine, no big disagreements, and all is well. Good! Whatever worked to getting your relationship “pretty good” we encourage you to keep doing it. Sometimes it is just as important to know what works and why it works as it is to know what doesn’t work and why. Now, you know and we know that sometimes things change, a child goes to university (and that is a difficult adjustment), communication is not working as well as it once did, conflicts appear more frequent, your partner is communicating with their smart phone more often than communicating with you, or one or both of you would rather be at work than at home. Well these things can become barriers, but they need not destroy the relationship.